Shahkrit shows his taste in love as well as food

Art November 28, 2013 00:00

By ntsoopsip@gmail.com

3,760 Viewed

Every actor has a different approach to preparing for dramatic scenes, whether it's seeking out a quiet place, throwing himself against a wall, or tunnelling into his bag of experience.



 Shahkrit “Krit” Yamnarm’s methodology has to be unique: If he’s got a shoot coming up, he just doesn’t eat anything that’s “five-star delicious” that day.
It probably has something to do with the fact that he’s a good cook. He also hosts the cooking show “Krua Laew Tak Krit”, a follow-up to his successful stint on the popular series “Iron Chef Thailand”. 
“If I’m full up with yummy stuff, I’m happy all day long,” Shahkrit tells GM magazine. “It’s like having happy chemicals flowing around my body – it gets me high – I just can’t be sad.”
He can’t even pretend to be sad, so that causes a problem if he’s got some “serious” acting to do. But how does the host of a cooking show, on which the food is presumably always yummy, ever manage to do anything dramatic for the cameras?
Shahkrit sticks to the basics – what he calls “comfort food”. His favourite is krating klook foon – a plate of beef stir-fried with garlic, pepper, coriander root, flour and kapi shrimp-paste. “For me, comfort food is simple home cooking like my mum does. It’s still extremely yummy. When I’m tired after work, I eat this dish and I always miss my mum a lot.”
Shahkrit says he and the other “critics” on “Iron Chef”, including Ananroj Tangsupanich, always took home the leftover ingredients after every episode. They wrapped up the taping and then wrapped up the goods – and they were often expensive items like lobster and wagyu beef and Alaskan crab. “Once when we had some wagyu beef I asked Ananroj what he would cook it with and he said phad krapao.”
Shahkrit got married just last year and it seems that his favourite topics are love and food. He says he’s most relaxed in the kitchen, cooking for his wife “Woonsen” Viritipha. “It’s like my meditation place. It’s my comfort zone.” They both enjoy trying a new cuisine.
Deeply smitten, he’s says he’s much happier as a married man. The reason they married after only dating for a few months was that they were both terrified they might break up otherwise. “So we got married and it just gets better and better, and now we feel so much more secure about our love.”
Shahkrit is chuckling as he shares all this, but he turns serious when asked about his hit romantic film “February” and its catchphrase, “Do you believe in destiny?”
“I believe in it,” he says, still swooning over the thought of Woonsen. They’d both been in show business for more than 10 years and knew a lot of