False hope perhaps, but at least it’s free

your say April 03, 2018 01:00

Re: “Roads jammed as 30,000 people line up for free herbal cancer ‘cure’”, The Nation, April 1.



In the comments on Facebook where I read this story people are drawing comparisons between East and West, with the West of course being better. It seems to me that we have an equal number of miraculous cures in the West with the only difference being the cost. How often do we read pleas for funding to take someone to a foreign country as they have a possible cure but it will cost x amount, always grasped at as a last hope but not often effective.

I will applaud someone for giving hope even if in my opinion it is false, at least they are not charging a fortune from the unfortunates, good luck to them.

Before anyone reminds me that they are giving false hope, can I draw the comparison with any organised religion which offers prayers as the ultimate answer to all problems – and we all know how wealthy they are.

PJPom 

I have had some connection with Mahidol University in the past. Their department of Herbal Pharmacology and Botany were well-developed and well organised. Thai doctors used to receive training in Traditional Thai Medicine as well as modern medicine. I incorporated herbal pharmacology and treatment into my integrated medical practice in the United States with great success. I lectured on this in most of the major hospitals and universities in Southern California. Honestly I am sceptical of this guy – treating a case is not like stamping out Christmas cookies. Each case must be taken on an individual basis with a detailed medical history and exam. In addition, 10 capsules of what might even be a valid formula is not going to cure anybody. 

    If you do some research you’ll see the tremendous strides are being made with phyto-medicines (plant-based). This is documented in many of the major research journals and university teaching hospitals. About 40 per cent of all pharmaceutical medicine is still plant-based. Cannabis oil is showing tremendous promise in the treatment of cancer. So much so that a couple of the major pharmaceutical companies are trying to take over the whole thing. Bottom line is that the real art in practising medicine is adjusting to time and circumstance and knowing what to use when.

joeyg

30,000 is a lot of people. I guess the ill and dying will be willing to try anything. Some hope is better than no hope at all. I wonder if any of these ingredients have been tested. Can you sue if you die after taking this free “cure”...

DavisH

Nope. No clinical trials. No idea if there are any side effects or adverse reactions. The sad part of this event is that these are probably people who have terminal cancer or who cannot access full cancer care. Many people do not appreciate that the poor and disadvantaged cannot afford full cancer care, or do not have the means to undergo  chemotherapy or radiation treatments. Also many people decline the treatments because they are scared or because no one has taken the time to explain it to them.

geriatrickid

ThaiVisa