“Lieders” for the afternoon

music January 13, 2018 15:02

By The Nation

The music of Dr Saisuree Chutikul takes centre stage tomorrow (January 14) in a free concert, “Art Songs in Thailand”, organised by The National Research Council of Thailand and the Princess Galyani Vadhana Institute of Music and taking place at the Institute’s Sangita Vadhana Hall starting at 2pm.



The concert is based on the research project “Art Songs in Thailand: Arranging and Performing Dr Saisuree’s Vocal Works” by Dr Chanyapong Thongsawang.

 “Art song” derives from a German musical term “Lieder”, a 19th-Century practice known as lied and referring to the setting of poems to music, specifically for voice with piano accompaniment. Famous lieds include works by Franz Schubert, Robert Schumann and Johannes Brahms. These repertoires demand vocal skill and techniques. In the late 18th-Century, renowned composers often applied rhetorical figures and wrote music related to a context of a selected lyrical poet. From the 20th Century art songs were applied for Thai vocal music by Dr Saisuree. These art songs are distinguishable from other Thai songs, traditional music and Thai popular music. One notable feature is the application of Thai pentatonic melodic lines and language to western classical harmony.

 The programme includes Thai art songs composed by Dr Saisuree as well as Thai vocal compositions written by prominent Thai classical music teachers such as ML Puangroy Snitwongs Apaiwongs, Piyabhand Sanitwongse Na Ayudhya, Prasidh Silapabanleng, Chao Phraya Thammasakmontri, and Nat Yontararak. The concert will be performed by Dr Chanyapong, Moragot Cherdchoo-ngarm (piano), Sittichai Pengcharoen (violin), Jairat Pitakcharoen, Asst Prof. Pongsak Arayangkoon, Korawij Devahastin Na Ayudhya, Mashima Meebamrung and Zion Daoratanahong.

 Admission is free but reservations are recommended. Call (02) 447-8597 extension 1130.

The Princess Galyani Vadhana Institute of Music is on Soi Arun Amarin 36, in Bang Yi Khan sub-district. Visit www.pgvim.ac.th.