Floral arches for His Majesty

lifestyle October 16, 2017 16:00

By The Nation

Bangkok’s much-loved flower market Pak Klong Talad is turning into a flower sanctuary dedicated to His Majesty the late King Bhumibol Adulyadej with an event it’s calling “Flowers for Dad”.



Running from Saturday (October 21) to October 27, the project brings together flower vendors, the public and volunteers from across the country to take part in decorating six remarkable floral arches using millions of flowers. The exhibition will be held along a 400-metre-long stretch of Chakphet Road and each floral arch displays different meanings about the deep feeling of love and loyalty the Thai people have for the late Monarch. 

The first arch called “Thais” features an astonishing floral tunnel designed to resemble a dazzling fabric. The length of the tube is 89 metres to represent His Majesty’s age when he died. The edge of the tunnel is decorated with pure white flowers, while different colours are gradually added to grow into the colours of the Thai flag. 

The second arch called “The Rain” is inspired by the famous picture of the granny Tum Channit holding a wilting lotus flower while waiting patiently to greet the late King . The picture was taken in the year 1955, during his visit to Nakhon Phanom Province. The meaning of this flora arch implies that King Bhumibol’s graciousness is like the rain, or showers of blessing, which revive withered flowers and lets them become blooms in Thai hearts. This arch uses lotus flowers to simulate a stream of water. A floating lotus implies that the principles of the late King help enlighten people.

“The Imprint” is the title of the third arch and is fashioned into the shape of a mountain range in Thailand’s north. It is decorated with bountiful chrysanthemums mixed in with other flowers that grow in the north and become the floriculture products that drive the local economy. 

Then comes the “Home” arch boasting an assortment of 77 daffodils in the shape of Thailand. This decorative arch conveys the meaning of the love that Thai people, from all 77 provinces have for King Bhumibol. 

The fifth one is “King Rama IX” arch decorated with marigolds – their yellow the symbolic colour of the day on which the late Monarch was born – in the shape of the Thai numeral nine. 

The last one “Montarop” represents a heaven’s gate and is exquisitely decorated with montarop flowers, or magnolia, which is believed to originate in heaven.

For further information about the exhibition, visit “ChumchonPakKlongTalad” page on Facebook.