File photo: National Anti-Corruption Commission President Pol General Watcharapol Prasarnrajkit
File photo: National Anti-Corruption Commission President Pol General Watcharapol Prasarnrajkit

No word yet on Prawit’s third try at watches explanation

Breaking News February 09, 2018 15:11

By The Nation

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National Anti-Corruption Commission President Pol General Watcharapol Prasarnrajkit said on Friday that the body’s secretary-general has not yet updated the corruption-fighting body about whether Deputy PM Prawit Wongsuwan has submitted his third try at an explanation about his possession of luxury watches.



However, the president said it is likely that they would wrap up their initial probe into the case and report to the NACC by the end of this month.

Netizens have tracked down photos of Prawit wearing many different watches from what looks to be an extravagant and extensive collection. At least 25 watches have been detected so far, worth more than Bt30 million based on the market price.

The scandal arose after Prawit was seen wearing a very expensive Richard Mille watch during a photo session with the new Cabinet late last year, prompting complaints to the NACC and the launch of a probe.

On a different matter, Watcharapol commented on the progress of the Constitutional Court’s deliberation about qualifications for NACC members. The NACC had submitted its explanation to the court but has not received any responses or requests for further information, he said.

While awaiting the court’s ruling on their qualifications, NACC members would continue working as usual, he said.

The National Legislative Assembly last autumn passed the new NACC bill, including waiving the disqualifications of NACC members that are outlined in the charter. That removal prompted some to question the constitutionality of the amendment.

Some members of the National Legislative Assembly then filed a petition with the NACC. asking it to rule on the case, citing concerns that allowing dubious qualifications would discredit the NACC and make its work untenable due to a public loss of trust.

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