Kasititorn Pooparadal, senior executive vice president at the Digital Economy Promotion Agency (DEPA).
Kasititorn Pooparadal, senior executive vice president at the Digital Economy Promotion Agency (DEPA).

Teachers unhappy with school Web speeds, poll finds

Economy October 18, 2017 01:00

By JIRAPAN BOONNOON
THE NATION

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ONLY 35 per cent of science teachers are satisfied with the high-speed Internet service at their schools, which also suffer from a nationwide lack of teachers with specialist computer skills, a survey has found.



The Digital Economy Promotion Agency (DEPA) linked with CSN Research to conduct the national survey on digital usage in schools.

They also conducted a survey on software usage in the healthcare sector. The poll fond that a single healthcare platform would provide greater convenience for the public and healthcare professionals.

In the schools survey, Kasititorn Pooparadal, senior executive vice president at DEPA, said that the poll was conducted from April to July and which collected the opinions of science teachers at 923 schools. Thailand has 31,056 schools.

The survey reported that 99 per cent of schools have high-speed Internet connections. 

Around 35 per cent of science teachers were satisfied with the connection speed; those who weren’t happy with the service said it did not serve their needs. 

Some 55 per cent of the respondents said that they have no teachers with specialist computer skills at their schools to offer technical support. Some 45 per cent of respondents said they had one or two computer specialists on staff. 

Fifty-seven per cent of the teachers polled developed and shared content only in their school and 5 per cent shared their content |via YouTube. Therefore, teachers should share their content with other schools so that it would improve digital literacy of other teachers nationwide, the survey findings indicate.

For the survey on software usage in the healthcare sector, this was also conducted from April to July. Healthcare IT specialists in 809 hospitals – out of the 11,857 hospital nationwide – were polled. The survey reported that in the next four to five years, hospitals and healthcare related-government units would need a centralised database. This would enable the sharing of information. For hospitals, centralisation will help to promote patient-centred medicine where minimum travel is required by a patient. 

In addition, the survey also shows that the development and adoption of digital technology in health services will lead to the provision of homecare services, enabling patients to benefit from the convenience. The digital technology will also help drive more effective healthcare services in the future.