The Nation

business

Smaller
Larger

Two popular state news shows get new life on Nation TV

News announcers and broadcasters who worked at Nation Channel when it was established 12 years ago pose for a photo with current announcers at the 'Nation Channel: Digital Media Landscape 2012' event at Bangkok Convention Centre Central Plaza.

News announcers and broadcasters who worked at Nation Channel when it was established 12 years ago pose for a photo with current announcers at the 'Nation Channel: Digital Media Landscape 2012' event at Bangkok Convention Centre Central Plaza.

Nation Channel will today start airing two daily news programmes based on popular shows that were pulled from Modernine TV by MCOT.

The two programmes, unveiled during a special event on Saturday to mark Nation Channel's 12th anniversary, are called "Khao Khon Khon Nation" (News in Depth by Nation Reporters) and "Khao Khon Rub Arun" (Morning News in Depth).

"Khao Khon Rub Arun" is modified from "Chao Khao Khon" and "Khao Khon Khon Nation" from "Khao Khon Khon Khao", the two popular news programmes that ended recently.

"Khao Khon Khon Nation" will run from 9:30pm-10.30pm on weekdays. Its hosts will include popular news anchorman Kanok Ratwongsakul.

"Khao Khon Rub Arun" will be shown on weekdays from 6am-8am. Kanok will also host the programme together with other popular anchors, including Jomquan Laopet.

Nation Broadcasting Corporation (NBC), which operates Nation Channel, expects the two new programmes will be well received because they will continue to be overseen by the same "A-Team" from the two programmes that were removed from state-run Modernine TV.

Being dumped by state-owned TV stations became a hot topic of discussion during the event held at BCC Hall 5 of Central Lat Phrao.

The hosts of popular programmes that were purged by state-run TV took part in a roundtable on Saturday. They included Suthichai Yoon, chairman and editor-in-chief of Nation Multimedia Group, Kanok, Jomquan and Yuwadee Boonkrong, former executive of Media of Medias.

They shared their experience from producing programmes on terrestrial TV and unanimously agreed that the future for content providers for free-to-air channels was not clear.

They said the free-to-air broadcasters used to have much influence because channels were few in number and inadequate to meet the demand of programme producers. But now, satellite TV had reduced the clout of

terrestrial TV, which would become even less important when the National Broadcas-ting and Telecommunications Commission issues licences for digital terrestrial TV.


Comments conditions

Users are solely responsible for their comments.We reserve the right to remove any comment and revoke posting rights for any reason withou prior notice.